Youth Tech











{August 28, 2006}   Podcast on DOPA and Second Life

Recently, I participated in a podcast with the Library 2.0 Gang on Talking with Talis (http://talk.talis.com/) about DOPA and the Second Life Library project (http://www.infoisland.org/). It is an interesting mix of topics because both are about social computing/networking where one represents, dare I say it, the future and the other represents the reactionary side effects of moving into that future.

 

DOPA for those who aren’t intimately acquianted with U.S. politics is the Deleting Online Predators Act. If you want to know more about DOPA go to the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), for they have done a wonderful job in collecting information, explaining the act and laying out the possible effects on library service here at: http://teentechweek.wikispaces.com/DOPA. Hopefully, the discussion will further assist in informing those who don’t understand or know about the possibilities of DOPA upon public library service to teens in this country.

 

SL LibraryThe whole Second Life Library project has such enourmous potential to do some interesting work with virtual worlds, services and programs. Lori Bell, the Director of Innovation, at the Alliance Library System (http://www.alliancelibrarysystem.com/) and her team of energetic and visionary volunteers have done some exciting things on Info Island. If you haven’t checked it out, you need to set up your Second Life account now (http://www.secondlife.com/). Your first account setup is free, so what are you waiting for.

 

Anyway, the podcast conversation was a good bit of fun with plenty of lively and informative comments and bantering. Again, check it out at: Talking with Talis.

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{August 24, 2006}   Ren Gen

After attending a presentation last February in San Antonio, TX, I’ve had a real hard time getting this idea/ideal out of my mind. The program was put together by OCLC (www.oclc.org). Several people talked of a variety of issues all of which had something to do with a new report that OCLC was releasing (http://www.oclc.org/reports/2005perceptions.htm).

Long story short, one of the speakers was Patricia Martin of LitLamp (www.litlamp.com). She spoke about what she is calling the rennaisance generation. Those who want to create and interact with services and institutions more than they want to just consume what those services and instututions offer. It is the gamer generation yet not as narrowly defined. Within her presentation she mentioned a website that had emerged from this idea of the Ren Gen (therengen.com). Ms. Martin is currently working on a book that captures this idea and generation. It is what we who work with youth with open minds and eyes see and understand about them. It is what this blog is trying to capture and facilitate. Enough of my blabbering. Please check it out, sign up (therengen.com) and get active in this ideal.



{August 24, 2006}   Media Snackers

YO! If you haven’t checked this out then you need to. Media Snackers is a fairly new thing in the UK, and their work reverberates throughout the world. They are awesome when it comes to youth advocacy for creative media uses and understandings. Check out their site at: www.mediashackers.com. Listen to some of their podcasts at: www.mediasnackers.com/focus/podcasts/. Get involved/join them at: www.mediasnackers.com/join/.



{August 18, 2006}   Impossible

This really caught my eye today while reading through some blogs.

Impossible

Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.

-John Maxwell in The Difference Maker quoting a Adidas ad he saw in ESPN Magazine.

From:http://800ceoread.com/blog/archives/006399.html



{August 17, 2006}   Cyworld …

If you haven’t heard or read about it yet there is another social networking site that has just opened it’s doors here in the US. Cyworld is South Korea’s most popular social network. “Cy” is the Korean word for “relationship.” It represents a playful, kitschy mix of Blogger, Flickr with videogame like avatars. The article in Business 2.0 states that it brings in about $300,000 a day. It has discovered a new business model for these types of sites. The site is free, but if one wants to personalize it they must pay. Pay though is hardly what one might think, for the average user purchases virtual items for their profile to the tune of about $7.00 per year. By comparison MySpace with its atrocious ad laden site makes about $2.17 per user per year.

Check it out: Cyworld
Get the low down from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyworld



{August 17, 2006}   MySpace for Parents

Jesse Vieau, a colleague in Teen Services, and I have been teaching a workshop entitled, “MySpace for Parents.” In thinking about developing the class we really just wanted to inform, educate and hopefully demystify MySpace for parents. The two classes that we offered have been rather successful with about 30 in total attendance. We’ve also had a fair amount of local media coverage which is good, because it reminds the community that the library is here for change. We are here to help them with cultural, informational and educational change.

We will be offering about 10 more seesions of this workshop around the library system in the months of September, October and November. Attached you will find a brochure that has been developed for the class.

If you haven’t offered something like this in your library or system you should consider it. Feel free to contact me if you have any other questions about it. You don’t have to be and expert. You just have to be willing to learn and develop some understanding.



et cetera