Youth Tech











{October 9, 2006}   Technorati and MySpace

While investigating Technorati for my Learning 2.0 exercise I noticed an interesting post and thought that I’d pass it along. I’m still not finished with investigating Technorati, but already am convinced that I need to pay more attention to this for my posts as I do hope to post more frequently in the future.

Just a side note: if anyone is reading or paying attention out there, I’m wondering if you all have taught youth about Techorati or del.icio.us. If so, how have you gone about it and for what purpose.

Back to the MySpace post. I thought this was cool for a couple of reasons one that it was at NC State and another that it was socially oriented and being done by a tenure-track faculty member, i.e., someone that is a bit older than the typical MySpace generation. I would be in that older demographic as well. Enough of my gibberish, here is the actual article.

“Hip Happy Prof” teaches over MySpace, bosses protest …
Evidently a Sociology Professor at NC State is offering a class on Social Movements for Social Change that is using MySpace as its primary place of instruction and interaction. Cool! Yeah go for it, evidently that’s not the case, for he is catching all sorts of flack for it, especially from administrators. When that kind of stuff (flack from folks, etc.) happens within a controlled space of learning you have got to know that you are on to something. My depiction of this does not do it justice please check it out and support such bold innovative thought and movement within our academic environments. http://indyweek.gyrobase.com/gyrobase/Content?oid=38223



Although I tend to focus and all forms of literacy I do believe, as a librarian, that if one were to rely upon one basic form of literacy it should be reading a language. Here is an interesting documentary that I have not watched, but looks to have much promise for those of us in the literacy business, especially libraries and schools. It is hosted/narrated by Henry Winkler (the Fonz).

the fonz

 

Check it and more info about it at: http://www.readingrockets.org/shows/watch#brain.



Experts meet with Congress to discuss how afterschool programs that teach science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills through fun, engaging activities such as computer programming, robotics, and 3-D digital animation. The briefing was sponsored by the Coalition for Science After School, the Afterschool Alliance, the National
Science Teachers Association and the National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics in conjunction with the Senate and House Science, Technology,
Engineering and Math (STEM) Education Caucuses and the Senate and House
Afterschool Caucuses. For more information on STEM and afterschool check out: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/news_events.cfm#4000491



{September 27, 2006}   Pew Study and Virtual Worlds

Check out the recent post by Kelly Czarnecki on YALSA’s blog about the recently released Pew Internet Study. She brings up some good questions and possible issues about virtual worlds and video/computer games. Are/can virtual worlds and video/computer games addictive? What role within libraries can we maintain within such a conversation and concern?



{September 25, 2006}   Nominate a Beautiful Girl …

I just received this from New Moon and had to pass it along. What a wonderful idea.

new moon logo
Please help New Moon magazine’s Girls Editorial Board redefine beauty by
nominating a girl you know for our 8th Annual “25 Beautiful Girls” issue
(May/June 2007). In this special issue, New Moon’s girl editors honor 25
girls who exhibit INNER beauty and strength of character. Every nominee
receives a copy of the magazine (all nominees are listed on the inside
back cover) and a special certificate.

All nominations must be received by October 1. You have a week, so get going. See contest directions and nomination method here at New Moon Magazine’s web site.

I know that I have a couple of nominations to prepare.



{August 28, 2006}   Podcast on DOPA and Second Life

Recently, I participated in a podcast with the Library 2.0 Gang on Talking with Talis (http://talk.talis.com/) about DOPA and the Second Life Library project (http://www.infoisland.org/). It is an interesting mix of topics because both are about social computing/networking where one represents, dare I say it, the future and the other represents the reactionary side effects of moving into that future.

 

DOPA for those who aren’t intimately acquianted with U.S. politics is the Deleting Online Predators Act. If you want to know more about DOPA go to the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), for they have done a wonderful job in collecting information, explaining the act and laying out the possible effects on library service here at: http://teentechweek.wikispaces.com/DOPA. Hopefully, the discussion will further assist in informing those who don’t understand or know about the possibilities of DOPA upon public library service to teens in this country.

 

SL LibraryThe whole Second Life Library project has such enourmous potential to do some interesting work with virtual worlds, services and programs. Lori Bell, the Director of Innovation, at the Alliance Library System (http://www.alliancelibrarysystem.com/) and her team of energetic and visionary volunteers have done some exciting things on Info Island. If you haven’t checked it out, you need to set up your Second Life account now (http://www.secondlife.com/). Your first account setup is free, so what are you waiting for.

 

Anyway, the podcast conversation was a good bit of fun with plenty of lively and informative comments and bantering. Again, check it out at: Talking with Talis.



et cetera