Youth Tech











{December 6, 2006}   YouthLearn’s 100 Big Things …

YouthLearn’s 100 Big Things in Youth, Technology & Education

If you are working with youth in any capacity that touches upon either technology & education you need to read through this list (http://www.youthlearn.org/resources/newsletter/issue100.html),
print it out and use it in planning your activities for the next year or so. Following are a few things that I pulled out of the list that looked interesting.

4. Text Messaging & IM
20. Wikipedia
21. YouTube
23. MySpace.com

32. Gaming & Education
33. Global Kids Online Game Project
34. Girls Creating Games
35. Second Life

39. Youth Civic Engagement & Technology
56. MediaRights.org
78. NAMAC’s Youth Resources
94. Youth & Media

Check out the newsletter list for descriptions and links to further resources.
http://www.youthlearn.org/resources/newsletter/issue100.html

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{December 5, 2006}   Whyville & Stacey Orrico …

Whyville

I recently received an email from Whyville. Need I ask why? I don’t know, but anyway it is one of the more interesting social networking sites out there for tweens and teens. eSchool News writes about it as being a safe social networking site for youth.

Whyville has over 1.7 million residents that come to learn create and have fun together. It has its own newspaper, politicians, beach, economy, city hall and much, much more.

Check it out, for tonight Stacey Orrico is giving a free virtual concert there.



TOYChallenge

I ran across this the other day and wanted to pass it along. Founded in 2001 Sally Ride Science’s mission is to empower girls to explore the world of science. They have recently announced the TOYchallenge. It is a toy design challenge for imaginative boys and girsl that are 5-8th graders to create a new toy or game. They go on to state that “(t)Toys are a great way to learn about science, engineering, and the design process! As girls and boys create a toy or game, they experience engineering as a fun, creative, collaborative process, relevant to everyday life.”

For more information: http://www.toychallenge.com/abouttc.shtml



Although I tend to focus and all forms of literacy I do believe, as a librarian, that if one were to rely upon one basic form of literacy it should be reading a language. Here is an interesting documentary that I have not watched, but looks to have much promise for those of us in the literacy business, especially libraries and schools. It is hosted/narrated by Henry Winkler (the Fonz).

the fonz

 

Check it and more info about it at: http://www.readingrockets.org/shows/watch#brain.



Experts meet with Congress to discuss how afterschool programs that teach science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills through fun, engaging activities such as computer programming, robotics, and 3-D digital animation. The briefing was sponsored by the Coalition for Science After School, the Afterschool Alliance, the National
Science Teachers Association and the National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics in conjunction with the Senate and House Science, Technology,
Engineering and Math (STEM) Education Caucuses and the Senate and House
Afterschool Caucuses. For more information on STEM and afterschool check out: http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/news_events.cfm#4000491



{September 26, 2006}   What makes progress?

“It is not what you do that counts, it is what you help others do that makes progress.”
— Herman Wells



{August 24, 2006}   Ren Gen

After attending a presentation last February in San Antonio, TX, I’ve had a real hard time getting this idea/ideal out of my mind. The program was put together by OCLC (www.oclc.org). Several people talked of a variety of issues all of which had something to do with a new report that OCLC was releasing (http://www.oclc.org/reports/2005perceptions.htm).

Long story short, one of the speakers was Patricia Martin of LitLamp (www.litlamp.com). She spoke about what she is calling the rennaisance generation. Those who want to create and interact with services and institutions more than they want to just consume what those services and instututions offer. It is the gamer generation yet not as narrowly defined. Within her presentation she mentioned a website that had emerged from this idea of the Ren Gen (therengen.com). Ms. Martin is currently working on a book that captures this idea and generation. It is what we who work with youth with open minds and eyes see and understand about them. It is what this blog is trying to capture and facilitate. Enough of my blabbering. Please check it out, sign up (therengen.com) and get active in this ideal.



{August 18, 2006}   Impossible

This really caught my eye today while reading through some blogs.

Impossible

Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.

-John Maxwell in The Difference Maker quoting a Adidas ad he saw in ESPN Magazine.

From:http://800ceoread.com/blog/archives/006399.html



{June 28, 2006}   Beginnings …

Welcome!

This is a site/blog that will post, converse, write and communicate about issues that involve youth (teens, tweens & tods) and how best to interact, educate, entertain, relate and learn. We hope to post on broad themes and specific issues that will be of interest to educators and learners within the following institutional situations: schools, libraries, media & technology centers, museums, community arts centers, youth clubs and beyond.

The authority represented by this endeavor is only through desire. We do not claim to have particular expertise, etc., but we do have understanding, knowledge, interest and an occasional question or two that we would love to share.

This site is more about creating a conversation, a dialogue about working with youth in creative/innovative environments.

I think that fairly represents our intentions, so lets get this party started.

~Matt



et cetera